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Kristin / 20.
If I had to live my life again, I’d make the same mistakes, only sooner.

sixpenceee:

Took me forever to make the gifs for this but, Beldent Almost Identical is a social experiment in which people are asked to judge identical twins. There’s only one difference between them and that is, that one is chewing gum while the other is not.

Based on this one characteristic only, people have landed on drastic assumptions of these twin’s personality.

Based on the youtube video comments, many have criticized the experiment with the main one being how facial expressions and posture could’ve led to those assumptions instead as well as the experiment design itself being unscientific. 

Either way, good job on marketing your gum beldent. 

WATCH THE VIDEO

(via leapingbelchingtriceratops)

1 week ago
18,092 notes

atraversso:

Nærøyfjord - Norway by Tomasz Furmanek

Please don’t delete the link to the photographers/artists, thanks!

(via metaconscious)

1 week ago
70,819 notes
neurosciencestuff:

Neurons in human muscles emphasize stimulation from the outside world
Stretch sensors in our muscles participate in reflexes that serve the subconscious control of posture and movement. According to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, these sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by one’s voluntary action, and most strongly to stretch that is imposed by external forces. The ability to reflect causality in this manner can facilitate appropriate reflex control and accurate self-perception.  
“The results of the study show that stretch receptors in our muscles indicate more than which limb is moving or how fast; these sensors also adjust their signals according to who caused the movement,” says Michael Dimitriou, who conducted this study and is currently a post doc at the Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Normally, we can easily distinguish between movements we make ourselves and movements that are imposed on our body by external forces. The ability to discriminate between self-generated and externally generated sensory events is crucial for accurate perception and the control of posture and movement. This ability is also believed to form the foundation on which conscious self-awareness is built.
Such discrimination between self and other has previously been thought to arise as a result of complex computations performed in the brain, that use prior knowledge or memories of the consequences of own actions. But the study by Michael Dimitriou shows that information on the cause of a sensory effect can be provided in real-time by so-called ‘muscle spindles’, a class of stretch receptors found in most of our skeletal muscles.
Muscle spindles differ from other sensory receptors, such as stretch receptors in the skin, because their sensitivity can be controlled by the nervous system via specialized motor neurons. The purpose of this control has been unclear. The neural data presented by Michael Dimitriou indicates that these specialized motor neurons increase the sensitivity of stretch receptors when the body is exposed to an externally imposed stretch stimulus, such as when a falling ball is caught in the hand. Because amplified spindle responses mean stronger stretch reflexes, the resulting muscle activity instantly counteracts movement of the hand. When making a voluntary movement, however, the nervous system ‘automatically’ reduces the sensitivity of spindles in the stretching muscles, thereby making it possible for us to move without setting off strong stretch reflexes that would otherwise counteract movement. Uncontrollably strong stretch reflexes are commonly referred to as ‘spasticity’.
“These results provide an explanation of how reflexes can be functionally adjusted to help us achieve our everyday tasks, without requiring conscious control of reflex sensitivity or complex computations in the brain for predicting the sensory consequences of our actions,” says Michael Dimitriou.
He believes that these new findings are important both for understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie movement control and self-perception, but also for understanding pathological states where these mechanisms are disturbed.
“With these findings, we also get new insights into mechanisms whose malfunction may contribute to neuromuscular problems such as spasticity or alien hand syndrome (also known as ‘Dr. Strangelove syndrome’), and help identify potential treatment targets for these conditions,” says Michael Dimitriou.

neurosciencestuff:

Neurons in human muscles emphasize stimulation from the outside world

Stretch sensors in our muscles participate in reflexes that serve the subconscious control of posture and movement. According to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, these sensors respond weakly to muscle stretch caused by one’s voluntary action, and most strongly to stretch that is imposed by external forces. The ability to reflect causality in this manner can facilitate appropriate reflex control and accurate self-perception.  

“The results of the study show that stretch receptors in our muscles indicate more than which limb is moving or how fast; these sensors also adjust their signals according to who caused the movement,” says Michael Dimitriou, who conducted this study and is currently a post doc at the Department of Integrative Medical Biology, Umeå University, Sweden.

Normally, we can easily distinguish between movements we make ourselves and movements that are imposed on our body by external forces. The ability to discriminate between self-generated and externally generated sensory events is crucial for accurate perception and the control of posture and movement. This ability is also believed to form the foundation on which conscious self-awareness is built.

Such discrimination between self and other has previously been thought to arise as a result of complex computations performed in the brain, that use prior knowledge or memories of the consequences of own actions. But the study by Michael Dimitriou shows that information on the cause of a sensory effect can be provided in real-time by so-called ‘muscle spindles’, a class of stretch receptors found in most of our skeletal muscles.

Muscle spindles differ from other sensory receptors, such as stretch receptors in the skin, because their sensitivity can be controlled by the nervous system via specialized motor neurons. The purpose of this control has been unclear. The neural data presented by Michael Dimitriou indicates that these specialized motor neurons increase the sensitivity of stretch receptors when the body is exposed to an externally imposed stretch stimulus, such as when a falling ball is caught in the hand. Because amplified spindle responses mean stronger stretch reflexes, the resulting muscle activity instantly counteracts movement of the hand. When making a voluntary movement, however, the nervous system ‘automatically’ reduces the sensitivity of spindles in the stretching muscles, thereby making it possible for us to move without setting off strong stretch reflexes that would otherwise counteract movement. Uncontrollably strong stretch reflexes are commonly referred to as ‘spasticity’.

“These results provide an explanation of how reflexes can be functionally adjusted to help us achieve our everyday tasks, without requiring conscious control of reflex sensitivity or complex computations in the brain for predicting the sensory consequences of our actions,” says Michael Dimitriou.

He believes that these new findings are important both for understanding the neural mechanisms that underlie movement control and self-perception, but also for understanding pathological states where these mechanisms are disturbed.

“With these findings, we also get new insights into mechanisms whose malfunction may contribute to neuromuscular problems such as spasticity or alien hand syndrome (also known as ‘Dr. Strangelove syndrome’), and help identify potential treatment targets for these conditions,” says Michael Dimitriou.

1 week ago
98 notes

ted:

Comedian and journalist Stella Young is tired of people telling her she’s an “inspiration” just for getting up in the morning. In a hilarious, hard-hitting, and thought-provoking talk at TEDxSydney, she explains why.   

Watch the full talk here»

(via ivory-and-clay)

1 week ago
111,524 notes
cumberbitchen221b:

scampthecorgi:

We have no idea what he’s doing…

drinking water but in a punk rock way

cumberbitchen221b:

scampthecorgi:

We have no idea what he’s doing…

drinking water but in a punk rock way

(via british-racing-green)

1 month ago
278,377 notes

seidur:

My soul is all warm and happy now. Need to do this more often. The water were warmer than the air in the middle of the night.

(via treeporn)

2 months ago
13,219 notes

staceythinx:

Breaking Wave is a kinetic sculpture designed by Plebian Design and Hypersonic for the biotechnology company Biogen-Idec’s new headquarters in Cambridge, MA.

About the project:

Breaking Wave tells the story of the search for patterns, and the surprising results that come by changing our point of view. 804 suspended spheres move in a wave-like formation. When the wave crests and breaks, the balls hover momentarily in a cloud. From almost anywhere in the room, this cloud is purely chaotic, but step into one of two hidden spots, and this apparent chaos shows a hidden pattern. From the first, a labyrinth hints at the search for knowledge, and from the second, a Fibonacci spiral inspired flower reminds us of the natural order and patterns found in nature.

Scientists search through billions of experimental data points in order to find patterns to develop new drugs, to treat Multiple Sclerosis, Cancer, and other diseases. Without a particular framework or perspective, these are just 0’s and 1’s, with no form or information. But with the perspective of an understanding of molecular dynamics, these data points create a clear picture about the hidden dynamics within the body, and allow scientists to craft drugs to successfully treat these diseases.

Above the sculpture lies the mechanism that drives its motion. A motor drives a large rotating stainless steel cam. 36 rollers follow the contour of the cam, which traces out the overall waveform. Each roller slides on a linear track, pulling a cable that spins one of the 36 output shafts. Distributed along each shaft are different sized drums from which the wooden sphere (coated in zinc and steel, and then rusted chemically) are hung. As the shafts rotate, the drums pull the balls up and down – larger drums pull balls higher. In this way, the size of the 804 drums mechanically programs the images hidden in the cloud of balls.

See it in motion in this video:

Breaking Wave from PLEBIAN DESIGN on Vimeo.

(Source: Vice Magazine)

1 week ago
712 notes

fristjra:

dissonant-harmony:

cassmecstasy:

thewolfmansbride:

wallyedge:

whatificantf0rgety0uu:

Ugh this is annoying

The fork pissed me off so much.

This ruined me.

This is all wrong

I can’t handle this

A lesson in frustration.

(Source: best-of-memes, via british-racing-green)

1 week ago
211,820 notes
bostonroll:

omg

Still have this original album artwork…

bostonroll:

omg

Still have this original album artwork…

(Source: sirromdrawde, via lordemusic)

1 week ago
1,399 notes

It’s 1 am and I can’t sleep because I think my stomach is twitching.

Like my upper left ab muscle just didn’t get enough today and is throwing a tantrum.

2 weeks ago
0 notes
unconsumption:

This may be the ultimate unconsumption challenge: Can something useful be done with the reported “5.6 trillion used cigarettes,” or filters from smoked cigarettes, more properly, that smokers discard annually? That’s said to add up to 766,571 metric tons of waste material
Motherboard reports that “a group of South Korean scientists recently published a study that proposes a one-step process to turn nasty ol’ flicked butts into something useful—like coating the electrodes of supercapacitors.”

The team from Seoul National University sees, if not beauty in trash, then at least some utility. They found that the cellulose acetate fibers that cigarette filters are made of could be turned into a carbon-based coating for the electrochemical components of supercapacitors.
[These] store extremely large amounts of electrical energy for things like backing up batteries, handling the fluctuating demands of laptops, storing the regenerative electrical power from electric cars’ brakes—all sorts of stuff.

Read more about it here: The Quest To Turn Littered Cigarette Butts into Something Useful | Motherboard
Popular Science has a writeup about this, too. “Here’s how the scientists described the process:” 


Used cigarette filters are composed largely of cellulose acetate. They are disposable, non-biodegradable, toxic and are a threat to the environment after usage. However, it has been reported that cellulose acetate can be directly utilized in the production of carbon materials containing a meso-/micropore structure by only a carbonization process [14]. That is, used cigarette filters could be used as a proper carbon source for supercapacitors. Importantly, carbonizing used cigarette filters in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere could provide the nitrogen doping on the carbon structure with the formation of such unique pore structures in a one-step process.

unconsumption:

This may be the ultimate unconsumption challenge: Can something useful be done with the reported “5.6 trillion used cigarettes,” or filters from smoked cigarettes, more properly, that smokers discard annually? That’s said to add up to 766,571 metric tons of waste material

Motherboard reports that “a group of South Korean scientists recently published a study that proposes a one-step process to turn nasty ol’ flicked butts into something useful—like coating the electrodes of supercapacitors.”

The team from Seoul National University sees, if not beauty in trash, then at least some utility. They found that the cellulose acetate fibers that cigarette filters are made of could be turned into a carbon-based coating for the electrochemical components of supercapacitors.

[These] store extremely large amounts of electrical energy for things like backing up batteries, handling the fluctuating demands of laptops, storing the regenerative electrical power from electric cars’ brakes—all sorts of stuff.

Read more about it here: The Quest To Turn Littered Cigarette Butts into Something Useful | Motherboard

Popular Science has a writeup about this, too. “Here’s how the scientists described the process:”

Used cigarette filters are composed largely of cellulose acetate. They are disposable, non-biodegradable, toxic and are a threat to the environment after usage. However, it has been reported that cellulose acetate can be directly utilized in the production of carbon materials containing a meso-/micropore structure by only a carbonization process [14]. That is, used cigarette filters could be used as a proper carbon source for supercapacitors. Importantly, carbonizing used cigarette filters in a nitrogen-containing atmosphere could provide the nitrogen doping on the carbon structure with the formation of such unique pore structures in a one-step process.

2 months ago
105 notes